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Wednesday, 29 February 2012

Volunteers wanted for World War II project

Airfields, spy schools, bombing ranges, bunkers and D-Day preparations have shaped the New Forest National Park into what it is today.

Now for the first time thanks to Heritage Lottery Funding a two year project will bring the complete history of World War II in the New Forest to life.

‘There are over 280 World War II sites within the New Forest that we know about that include 12 airfields, mock submarine pens and the construction site for Mulberry Harbours on Beaulieu River and the remains of the D-Day embarkation at Lepe - but there is more to be discovered,’ said James Brown, World War II Project Manager. ‘We are asking people to look in their garages and lofts to see if they have any photographs or records. We are also asking anyone who remembers being stationed or evacuated in the New Forest to come forward and share their memories.

‘The team has already heard a number of anecdotal memories including someone who visited the target planes on Ashley Bombing Range to acquire bits for his model airplanes; and army officers having to be careful of rumoured spies around the Forest.

‘We are also looking for people to get involved and become volunteers. If you would be interested in recording the memories of the people who were in the New Forest during World War II or getting involved in field walking and surveying World War II structures and remains let us know.’

The New Forest Remembers: untold stories of World War II team will be at the New Forest National Park Authority’s Volunteer Fair at Lyndhurst Community Centre on Saturday 3 March from 10:30am - 4pm for those who are interested in learning more or who are keen to get involved.

If you are keen to become a volunteer in this project visit www.newforestnpa.gov.uk/worldwarii/volunteering and complete an expression of interest form.


1 comment:

  1. Michael Donohue2 March 2012 at 11:52

    Whilst walking on heathland near Fritham recently I noticed a large white arrow in concrete slabs, which I presume pointed returning Airmen to Stoney Cross Airfield.
    I should be interested to know if this is in fact the reason for it's location.

    ReplyDelete