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Tuesday, 19 July 2011

Delicious new recipes from the New Forest Marque

The New Forest Marque has launched a new cookbook ‘More Seasoning’ which is bursting with mouth-watering dishes and heavenly desserts full of local ingredients. There are 60 recipes from New Forest producers for spring, summer, autumn and winter.

The recipe book contains a vast range of dishes to suite all tastes, from herb-crusted New Forest lamb for meat-lovers to a courgette and Lyburn cheese frittata for vegetarians. It is brimming with delicious desserts such as cranachan with New Forest honey and New Forest biscotti with jam trifles.

The ethos of the New Forest Marque is to work with local producers and farmers to help them promote their produce. By purchasing something which displays the New Forest Marque you are guaranteed to be buying something that is truly local.

Sarah Richards, New Forest Marque Manager, said: ‘This is the second New Forest Marque cookbook. We sold over 1,500 of Well Seasoned. The feedback was so positive we decided to produce a seasonal recipe book keeping the recipes simple and letting the food speak for itself.

‘Our Marque producers are so diverse which is how we are able to find so many interesting recipes, and the quality of the produce is second-to-none. We have three award-winning cheese makers as well as producers who make and prepare a wide range of products that include cakes, chutneys, honey products, fish and seafood, fruit and vegetables, jams, meats and much more.

‘Not only can you buy New Forest Marque products in the shops but you will also find them in many local pubs, restaurants and hotels, as well as neighbourhood stores and farmers’ markets.’

The More Seasoning cookbook costs £10 and is available to buy online at www.foreststore.co.uk or to download from iTunes at £1.79.

For more information about the Marque and to find out more about its local producers visit www.newforestproduce.co.uk.

Recommended Reading: A New Forest Reader: A Companion Guide to the New Forest, its History and Landscape


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